mostly polymers
"[Plastic is] the first magical substance which consents to be prosaic." - Roland Barthes
karamae.com
mostly polymers
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dollmeat7:

Tura Satana dances in Ted V. Mikels’ 1973 film: "The Doll Squad"..
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burleskateer:

A chorus girl wearing a very unique dance costume!..
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the-dark-city:

Myrna Loy is a competitive drinker in “The Thin Man” (1934)
the-dark-city:

Myrna Loy is a competitive drinker in “The Thin Man” (1934)
the-dark-city:

Myrna Loy is a competitive drinker in “The Thin Man” (1934)
the-dark-city:

Myrna Loy is a competitive drinker in “The Thin Man” (1934)
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i just watched this movie, its so romantic
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burleskateer:

Tana Louise
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omg this is my most hated 90210 incident and sends chills down my spine

but S.D. is the most beautiful
omg this is my most hated 90210 incident and sends chills down my spine

but S.D. is the most beautiful
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the-overlook-hotel:

At the beginning of The Shining, when Jack calls Wendy to tell her he got the job as winter caretaker of the Overlook, she sits in front of a painting of a woman holding a dog. The painting is titled “Woman and Terrier” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.
Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.
Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:
“I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“
Another of Colville’s paintings can be seen in the same Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen at the Overlook, near the end of the film. A fourth hangs in Room 237.
the-overlook-hotel:

At the beginning of The Shining, when Jack calls Wendy to tell her he got the job as winter caretaker of the Overlook, she sits in front of a painting of a woman holding a dog. The painting is titled “Woman and Terrier” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.
Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.
Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:
“I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“
Another of Colville’s paintings can be seen in the same Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen at the Overlook, near the end of the film. A fourth hangs in Room 237.
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